Category Archives: Breast Reconstruction

1 of Every 2 U.S. Women Consider Prophylactic Double Mastectomy for Early Tumors, University of Michigan Study Finds

One of every two women with early-stage breast cancer now consider removing both breasts, even though they only have cancer in one, according to a new University of Michigan study. This option has soared upwards from 3.9% in 2002, it said.

A quarter of women with early-stage breast cancer and a favorable prognosis strongly considered…
healio.com

Take-home Messages from #FORCE17

Force17

Here are 4 key messages of #FORCE17, which held its 10th anniversary conference last week on hereditary cancer issues.

  1. One-step and done? Nearly all breast reconstruction is not. Beware too, of scarless mastectomies claims.
  2. Breast reconstruction options for larger-framed women are improving. Now 3 of 10 women get nipple-sparing operations.
  3. Expect more gene discoveries in the next year or two that identify the deadliest tumors needing more aggressive treatment for prostate, pancreatic and other cancers where hereditary plays a role.
  4. Men need genetics testing too.

Summarized by Patricia Anstett, author, “Breast Cancer Surgery and Reconstruction: What’s Right for You,” from presentations at the conference of Facing Our Risk Empowered (FORCE).

Lumpectomy guidelines reduce need for return operations, study shows

After years of women returning for repeat lumpectomies because the margins of their tumor contain cancer, new guidelines are reducing these re-operations. Here’s a new study on the issue: http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaoncology/fullarticle/2630063?utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=content-shareicons&utm_content=article_engagement&utm_medium=social&utm_term=060517#.WTVwtIWiO2E.facebook

New Pain Relief Options After Breast Reconstruction

Linda holding pain system bag Apr 28 2017

Detroit breast cancer survivor, Dr. Linda Johnson, is shown here with the “On-Q Pain Relief System, which she used to reduce post-operative pain after breast reconstruction. It is a non-narcotic system. “This is a little pump about the size of a small can of soup that contains pain reliever that comes into your system automatically for a few days after surgery,’’ says Johnson, a retired school principal. “The pump goes to a tiny plastic tube that the surgeon installs in your chest. This little dickens really worked!!  All I had to do was to carry it around in the little nylon bag shown in the picture.  By day I used it like a shoulder bag and at night I just kept it beside me in the bed. The doc will take out the 4 or 5 inches of tubing that went into my body when I go for my check up next week.  Easy breezy, it gives a constant stream of pain relief, and doesn’t involve pills.” For details: http://www.myon-q.com/why-on-q.aspx

 

Over or Under: Breast Implant Placement Debate Continues

Where to place breast implants — under the chest muscle or over it — remains more a plastic surgeon’s choice. It’s an important discussion, in particular, for thinner, very active women, who sometimes complain that implants move inappropriately when they exercise. In plastic surgery, this is an issue known as “distortion.”

Here one doctor provides some clarity on why he and many other doctors prefer to place implants under the chest muscle. https://niume.com/post/247372https://niume.com/post/247372.

For more discussion on implant placement, see our book’s breast implant chapter. It discusses types of implants; problems; placement concerns and other issues.

 

 

 

 

 

Reconstructed Breasts Lose Sensation, NYT Reports

One of the realities about breast reconstruction that is rarely mentioned is the loss of sensation in the breast. Here, the NYT in a front-page story, reports one of the key issues that launched reporting for “Breast Cancer Surgery and Reconstruction: What’s Right for You.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/29/well/live/after-mastectomies-an-unexpected-blow-numb-new-breasts.html?smid=fb-share&_r=0

Public Health Leader Shares Life as Stage 4 Breast Cancer Survivor

Former Michigan public health director Vern Anthony continues to educate, this time with information that helps more understand that a cancer recurrence, even two as she has had, is not a death sentence. Her most important advice: Live your life fully. And she has tips about what NOT to say to someone with cancer.

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/life/2016/10/24/breast-cancer-longer-death-sentence-vernice-anthony/92696452/vernvern